Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” essay

HomeFree EssaysMusicMusic Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park”Buy Custom Essay
← A Day in the LifeHenry Purcell →

Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park”. Custom Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” Essay Writing Service || Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” Essay samples, help

Thesis

John Williams stands out as a genius of orchestral compositions that fuse the magnificence and beauty of nature into music. This is evident in the seven-minute long YouTube music file reflecting upon the strength that once graced Jurassic Park: it defines every second with rare musical notes to ensure that the movie never loses its global appeal.

Content

Tone

The collection begins with the “Dinosaurs Theme”: a horn solo that commences at a lower pitch. This music part slowly gains momentum and grows louder as it develops in between scenes and themes. Notably, “Theme from Jurassic Park” comprises three pieces; the most dominant one lasts for over four minutes. The random nature of the instruments used results to a high quality composition. The richness of sound in “The Lost World” offers an audience the much desired relaxation response. Similar to great musical concerts, Williams’ compositions for Jurassic Park seem to carry the storyline of the films. Indeed, the intelligent employment of the four components of tone provides the movie with its celebratory, adventurous, and satisfying touch (Ojala par. 5).

Texture

The themes follow a homophonic texture with a single melody used in the accompaniment of varied chords. It is easy for one to get the perception that Williams had made a point of venturing into the creation of a new and textural world for Jurassic Park. The focus on exotic percussion in rhythm looks promising, thus attempting to go an extra notch in defining the subject matter. The themes progress slowly and monotonously between movie sets, hence creating an atmosphere of awe. As we move into The Lost World, the new theme explodes into play, revealing yet another intelligent orchestration. Williams seems to have accentuated his compositions with textural effects of creepiness lingering at a distance (Ojala par. 10).

Meter, Surface Rhythm, Tempo, Musical Home Base, Melody/Melodic Contour, Crescendo/Descrendo

In “Theme from Jurassic Park”, the audience can note a repetitive pattern of weaker beats that precede a more dominant strong beat. Williams seems to have organized his musical bits in the way that breaks into constant regularity. The general and distant rhythms from various medium range drums and percussion, aided by natural accents, define the real texture of the new world. As though expected, “Theme from Jurassic Park” receives yet another considerate airplay towards the end of the piece. The greatest attractions in these themes are the repetitive cues that utilize the meaning of wild and natural rhythms.

Furthermore, the themes entail a mixture of fast and slow tempo. A fast tempo that bellows from within towards the middle of each piece infuses its audience with the feeling of excitement as well as energy. Contrarily, the slow tempo at the beginning and end of each piece creates a solemn and calming mood. Each theme contains a musical home base that stresses restfulness and stability in the way that commences and ends a melody.

The compositions commence and progress in the way that reveals shape but lacks continuity in between themes. However, the extensive intra-theme movement in pitch conveys adequate expectation for more action. Lastly, the themes focus on building a dialogue with the audience before going into a triumphant crescendo. For instance, “The Lost World” utilizes instruments from the percussion family in determining the level of gradual increases and declines in loudness.

Form

The music shifts in pace, depending on the perceived tension it attempts to create. For instance, “The Lost World” utilizes brass and intensive string sawing, thus displaying the urgency in variation. Therefore, all the themes presented in this piece follow the art of repetition in melody. Though there is lack of the binding aspect between themes, repetition ensures that the melodies continue replaying in the listeners’ minds.

The lower stringed and woodwind instruments play a repeated rhythm that shows their continuous presence in each piece. Contrarily, high string instruments applied in “The Lost World” seemingly present a dominant declaration with excellent rhythmic glissandos. The music prompts a sense of movement based on a constant and repetitive rhythm. The shift from “The Lost World” to the original Jurassic Park theme challenges on the general preparedness of the voyage ahead.

Context

There are three critical thematic ideas heard in this 7-minute long piece. The first, ideally known as “Theme from Jurassic Park”,relates to the composer’s view of nature and its beauty. The theme introduces the beauty and elegance of reconstructed creatures locked away on a lonely island. The second idea encompasses the form of fanfare as the helicopter ferrying approaches the island. This piece, too, seems to concentrate on the dinosaurs and their place of habitat. Such themes are ideal for quiet moments due to solo horns, keyboards, and woodwinds. The last theme consists of sharp disturbing notes. It is usually played in scenes involving the raptors. Therefore, the piece contains themes that relay contrasting feelings of calmness and danger (Ojala par. 13).

Aesthetic Response

The most important effect of the original soundtrack is a moving recreation and existence of dinosaurs in their original glory. In my own opinion, the orchestra represents a subtle chorus that rejoices and celebrates nature. Americans are adventure-loving people. Therefore, the emergence of Spielberg’s cinematographic creativity and Williams’ musical ingenuity results to content that is marvelous to an average American family. Thus, “Theme from Jurassic Park” is created with magnificence that brings the beauty of nature into music.

Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park”. Custom Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” Essay Writing Service || Music Analysis: John Williams’ “Theme from Jurassic Park” Essay samples, help

Order Now
Order nowhesitating

Related essays

  1. Henry Purcell
  2. Mambo
  3. A Day in the Life
  4. Michael Jackson
Order now